Frozen Fishtown

When you think about the fishing industry, the east coast and upper west coast comes to mind. These places are the first that come to my mind when I think of the fishing industry. There is a little town in Michigan that also embraces that industry. Leland, Michigan brings a little bit of that fishing industry feel in their Historic Fishtown. You can walk along the docks along side several shanties and smokehouses. Inside these shanties are several gift shops, eateries and art galleries. As you walk along the decks you will see fishnets and buoys. You will see decorative items enhancing the cultural feel of the fishing industry. This historic town was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. During the summer this area is packed with visitors. During the winter the fish town seems deserted as most of the shops have closed for the season. Winter is still a good time to visit this town.

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I stopped by Leland as I was making my way up to Northport on M-22 on a cold February day. I had the parking lot all to myself. I ventured on the dock area toward the end of the Fishtown Docks. This is where the ferry also deports for the Manitou Islands of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. As I walked onto the dock I heard a splashing sound just beyond the end of the docks. To my surprise a couple otters were playing around. They stuck their head out of the water and then quickly disappeared beyond the National Park Service Ferry that was docked in the small channel. It was interesting to look out to the break walls beyond heading out into Lake Michigan. In the distance you could see the dark stormy skies over the big lake. It appeared that a snow storm was on its way towards the lakeshore fairly soon.

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I continued walking on the dock up toward the small dam area just below the street within Downtown Leland. All the fishing decor and relics were still there frozen over in snow or were encased in a coating of ice. The shops were closed up and it was a far cry from the activity normally seen during the summer. The only thing that could be heard was the rushing waters crashing down from the dam. It is not too far off the mark of some of the east coast fishing towns that shut down during the winter season. Many of the shops and restaurants in these towns close up during the winter since business tends to be slow. It was a nice walk just to see some of the boats docked in the channel and not a person around. I walked through a small gated area leading up toward the parking lot. From there, I could get onto the overlook of the dam giving a great view of the channel, Fishtown and Lake Michigan in the distance.

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My time at Fishtown during the winter was not extensive. I spent about 25 minutes just walking around and taking photographs there. It certainly did not have the activity as there is during the summer, but I was glad I had made this particular stop. Often we need to see things in a different way than what we are used to. The overall scene of the Historic Fishtown did not change much from the summer. However, the dynamic of what I saw did. Instead of a town packed with people, I saw a town that was desolate and tranquil. I walked away embracing the value of this historic part of this town.

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Muskegon State Park Snow Adventures

Visiting Michigan’s State Parks during the winter can be a great recreational experience. During the winter there is a chance to see the parks in a different way than what many are accustomed to during the summer. There are also a few additional things to experience during the winter season than you would have during the summer. Often are winters in Michigan provide a lot of snow. Lately we have not had average snowfall in many parts of Michigan. I went to Muskegon a few years ago when we were getting a decent amount of snowfall and found the experience to be an adventure I would not forget.

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I drove into the State Park and was greeted by the sight of a ice covered Lake Michigan. Self Ice extended out into the lake pretty far. In the very distance you could see the open water. The park road takes you toward the main beach area. However, due to heavy snow, the plowed area of the road stops short of the beach area. This means that you have to walk it in from a small parking area. The thought of walking through large drifts of snow did not thrill me, the snow was no reason to stop me. In what was an interesting turn of events, further down the road there has hardly any snow at all as it was protected between large sand dunes. I started my way along the beach area and the parking lot. I had to climb up some dunes to head out toward the break walls. The dunes were interesting as a mixture of sand and snow made several unique patterns crafted by the winds off the lake. The break wall is made up of several large boulders. On a summer day, you can walk out along the break wall and see the boats coming in and out of the channel area connecting Lake Michigan with Muskegon Lake. The top of the break wall was pretty icy and it appeared to be too dangerous to walk out. I could see the lighthouse structure on the other end of the channel at the Pier Marquette Beach area from where I was standing.

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A small bay rests between the break wall and the channel. It is not that difficult to reach the channel from there. There is a walkway along the channel extending from Lake Michigan to the shore of Muskegon Lake. This also parallels the campground area. During the summer it is a prefect place to do a little fishing or catch the boats passing through. In the winter time, it is a nice little walk and hike. When I was there, the channel was open water and not frozen over in any place. The walkway along the channel also had minimal snow cover as well; making the hike much easier. The winter atmosphere was different than what I have experienced before. I had been so used to several people out on the walkway during the summer, it was strange to have the whole area to myself. It was quiet and peaceful. On the way back I took the roadside heading back to my car. The dunes area along the break wall near the beach was a bit strenuous. I walked through areas of road with little snow to areas covered in a couple feet of snow. Much of it depended on open areas surrounding the road.

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Although this park is much easier to navigate during the summer and has several recreational opportunities I would not recommend that anyone stay away from this park during the winter. Chances are you will not only have parts of the park alone to yourself, but the change in landscape scenery gives you a greater appreciation of the park. When I found the road closed up and had the chance to just turn around, I am glad I made the choice to go on foot from that point. I would have missed out on a lot if I had turned back.

 

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