Alone in Nature

You don’t have to go far to enjoy some of the beautiful elements of nature. Often they can be found at your local parks a few miles away. I have found beautiful creeks, sweeping vistas, discovered wildflowers and some of the best fall foliage. The winter season is no exception. You certainly get a different perspective on the landscape. The one major element that stands out with visiting these parks during the winter is how desolate it can be. Often you are the only one out there and all you hear is the sounds of animals scurrying, birds chirping and the howling of the winds.

Aman Park, Grand Rapids

I spent some time in the local county parks of Kent County to explore and to see how I could capture the winter landscape with my camera. The snow had just fallen and the trees were decorated with white fluffy snow on the branches. It was quite cold and the snow was fairly deep when hiking in certain areas. When out in the winter elements it is essential to wear the proper attire. I found that out the hard way once and cut short a winter excursion. The first park that I stopped at was Aman Park off of M-45. There was hardly anyone out on the trails. I took the trail downward to a bridge that crossed a small creek. It was amazing being in the middle of a snowy oasis. The snow on the trees beyond the bridge looked like I was about to step into another world. While I was hiking through this park, I was alone in nature. It was desolate out in the middle of the forest, but at the same time extremely peaceful.

Townsend Park, Rockford

I also went to Townsend Park on the other side of Kent County on a cold morning. Snow was foretasted once again, but I caught a gimps of sun as it rose amid some cloud cover. The section of the park I went to was closed off and had to hike it in. It is also one of the more beautiful places within this park so it was well worth the hike. A few bridges span over Bear Creek as it winds through the valley proportion of the park. The sun pushing through the clouds made a nice reflection off the water. Once again, I was the only one in the park at that time. There was plenty of fresh snow and the only tracks around were mine or those of animals that had passed through earlier. I am not the biggest winter person, but this time out in the park was really special. I was experiencing the still of the morning. For that moment of tranquility alone, I would recommend a winter hike to anyone.

The Guardian

As you enter the city of Newago there is a small roadside park that is easy to miss. I drove right past it as I was heading into Newyago, but something had caught my eye. I turned around and headed back to this roadside park. Just beyond the parking lot was a statue of a police officer with two children. It was a memorial to police officers who have not only served in Newagyo, but in the state of Michigan. I thought it was pretty fitting to be right before you enter the city. Police officers are often tasked with guarding and protecting citizens. What struck me is that this is the statue as you enter the city as if it was the guardian of the city.

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It was nice to see several flowers growing in the area and served as a nice foreground element to the statue. What I admired about this statue in particular was that the work of art showcased the softer side of law enforcement. When I was a kid I remember a representative of the police department showing up at schools talking to the classes providing tips about strangers and to come to a police officer if there was a sense of danger. I and many others always got the impression that the police officer was our friend. This was the public relations aspect to policing. The statue with the officer and the kids reminded me of those days growing up. That is what I really appreciated about this particular work of art. It showcased the softer side to police officers, something that has gone astray from how we as citizens view police to the officers themselves in how they view their role in policing.

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Beyond the statue is a trail that leads to a creek. You can hear the rushing waters cascading along some rocks and pieces of wood within the creek. The walk is a nice small walk to take and it quite relaxing. There are small outlets within the trail that will take you closer down to the creek, However, the main trail is what most people will stay on. The trail goes along the creek for about a fourth of a mile. The only issue I had was that I was there in the early part of spring and the leaves of the trees had not bloomed yet. The sun was staring me down as I was hiking the trail making it a little difficult to see at times. As with any hike, you always need to be aware of your surroundings.

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If you are in the Newaygo area, look for the roadside park. If you are taking M-37 North, the park will be on your right. Coming in the south direction look for the park on your left as you leave the city. It is a nice little park away from the city with a nice piece of public art. I am glad the statue caught my eye. Otherwise, I would have missed it and continued onward into the city.

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The Little Known Ledges

The Grand River has not hardly had the impact as the Colorado River has with the Grand Canyon. However, there is evidence that the River has shaped the lands around it. The Ledges of Grand Ledge is one example. You can access the Ledges at Fitzgerald Park in the city of Grand Ledge. These ledges are sedimentary rock that was cut from the flow of the Grand River over years.  The sandstone formations were made by the process of slit and clay carried by the by the water and deposited in layers along the river, this creating the ledges that we see today. This park is a great hiking spot for nature lovers and I have found that it is also one of the lesser known natural areas within the state.

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I have been there in each of the seasons. There is not a season where a trip to the ledges is not worth it. There is value in each season. In Spring and Summer you will see several ferns and plant life along the ledges. The leaves on the trees provide a nice shady walk in nature. During the fall season you are treated to the colorful changing of the leaves. My recent trip was during the winter. The snow on the ledges created a new and different scene from what I was used to. As you enter Fitzgerald Park you will be met with several picnic and playground areas. There are also a few baseball diamonds in the park as well. From the parking lot you will find a walkway taking you to the Historic Ledges Theater. Just around the back is a set of stairs heading to the ledges along the Grand River.

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Right near the base of the stairway is a bridge over a creek that flows into the Grand River. You can go in two different directions. You can continue along the Grand River or explore the ledges along the creek. If you explore along the creek be aware that the trail is not paved and there are many natural dangers in your way. I found that you have to be very aware of where you are stepping. Rocks and tree roots pop up from the ground and it is easy to trip and fall. The trail also can lead you on the bank of the creek. In the winter this is especially crucial. If you lose your footing, it is easy to slide right down into the creek. The upswing to this area is that you will see some of the ledges hang right above you. This area is a great spot to nab a photograph of the kids or family.

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Heading down the trail along the Grand River you are given views of the Grand River as well as the ledges over hanging above on the right side of the trail. This trail is not paved in areas as well but the trail is more distinct. This trail will take you toward Island Park. near the downtown area of Grand Ledge. This trail provides a great way to enjoy nature. As I hiked there in the winter, I saw frozen rolled up ferns hanging off some of the rocks. The views of these rocks are incredible. The trail also extends out on the other side of the stairway to the upper proportion of the park. If you are a hiker or nature enthusiast this is a good park to spend an afternoon at. For those rock climbing enthusiasts, Oak Park, located right across the river of Fitzgerald Park opens up the ledges for rock climbing. However, the bulk of the ledges can be found at Fitzgerald Park.

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