Sliding Away

Recently Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore reported that the famous Log Slide Overlook trail is closed to the public. Due to heavy snow, strong winds and dune erosion the overlook platform broke off and fell about 100 feet down the large sand dune. The overlook offered a couple different views of the area. First and foremost, you were able to see the Grand Sable Dunes off to the right. Recently shrubs and trees on the dune were creating somewhat of an obstruction to the view. To the left, you could see the cliffs of pictured rocks and Sable Point Lighthouse. It was quite the view from up there.

A4695b2

The area has quite the history. The logging industry has always been a big part of Michigan, particularly Northern Michigan. Years ago loggers used to slide the logs down the dunes to Lake Superior where they would be hauled out and taken to various mills. Legend from old lumberjack stories has stated that the logs going down the chute created enough friction that the chute would catch fire. While that is just a legend, I am sure the stories from that era were fascinating. The log slide is gone, but the beauty of the Grand Sable Dunes remain.

IMG_1407b2

The dunes strike a similar beauty to the Sleeping Bear Dunes with large inclines upward from the lake. Trails nearby the overlook and at Sable Falls will take you out to the sweeping hills of the dunes. Once at the edge of the 300 foot dune going down into Lake Superior;  you can take the trip down to the lake, but it is a hard walk back up the dune. It is also about a mile walk along the shoreline to Grand Maris, so plan accordingly. Those who have health issues should not take that hike or attempt to go down the sand dune. Sleeping Bear Dunes have had similar issues with visitors prompting the Coast Guard to make rescues for visitors. This can be a costly visit to your national park if you need to be rescued for this.

IMG_1408b2

As of now the trail to the overlook is closed up. According to the park officials the dune is not damaged and if the erosion is not substantial, they will build again. This incident is a constant reminder of the forces of nature. Man made structures often cannot hold up when natures elements are in full swing. The Upper Peninsula gets quite a bit of snow, so it is easy to understand that the weight of the snow, high winds that shift the sand can cause a collapse in a wood platform built into the dune. The next time they do build the platform, I am sure they will improve the structure. I do hope they get the platform back up. The scenery from the overlook was amazing.

Save

Frozen Fishtown

When you think about the fishing industry, the east coast and upper west coast comes to mind. These places are the first that come to my mind when I think of the fishing industry. There is a little town in Michigan that also embraces that industry. Leland, Michigan brings a little bit of that fishing industry feel in their Historic Fishtown. You can walk along the docks along side several shanties and smokehouses. Inside these shanties are several gift shops, eateries and art galleries. As you walk along the decks you will see fishnets and buoys. You will see decorative items enhancing the cultural feel of the fishing industry. This historic town was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. During the summer this area is packed with visitors. During the winter the fish town seems deserted as most of the shops have closed for the season. Winter is still a good time to visit this town.

IMG_1877b2

I stopped by Leland as I was making my way up to Northport on M-22 on a cold February day. I had the parking lot all to myself. I ventured on the dock area toward the end of the Fishtown Docks. This is where the ferry also deports for the Manitou Islands of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. As I walked onto the dock I heard a splashing sound just beyond the end of the docks. To my surprise a couple otters were playing around. They stuck their head out of the water and then quickly disappeared beyond the National Park Service Ferry that was docked in the small channel. It was interesting to look out to the break walls beyond heading out into Lake Michigan. In the distance you could see the dark stormy skies over the big lake. It appeared that a snow storm was on its way towards the lakeshore fairly soon.

IMG_3947b2

I continued walking on the dock up toward the small dam area just below the street within Downtown Leland. All the fishing decor and relics were still there frozen over in snow or were encased in a coating of ice. The shops were closed up and it was a far cry from the activity normally seen during the summer. The only thing that could be heard was the rushing waters crashing down from the dam. It is not too far off the mark of some of the east coast fishing towns that shut down during the winter season. Many of the shops and restaurants in these towns close up during the winter since business tends to be slow. It was a nice walk just to see some of the boats docked in the channel and not a person around. I walked through a small gated area leading up toward the parking lot. From there, I could get onto the overlook of the dam giving a great view of the channel, Fishtown and Lake Michigan in the distance.

IMG_3950b2

My time at Fishtown during the winter was not extensive. I spent about 25 minutes just walking around and taking photographs there. It certainly did not have the activity as there is during the summer, but I was glad I had made this particular stop. Often we need to see things in a different way than what we are used to. The overall scene of the Historic Fishtown did not change much from the summer. However, the dynamic of what I saw did. Instead of a town packed with people, I saw a town that was desolate and tranquil. I walked away embracing the value of this historic part of this town.

Save

Save

Winter Tales at Sleeping Bear Dunes: Port Oneida Historic District

The Port Oneida Historic District is one of the less traveled areas of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. This area continues north on M-22 into the Leelanau Peninsula. This is more of an area of countryside lands with old historic farms and houses. I have included this in one of the must see areas of a winter visit to Sleeping Bear Dunes for a reason. It is an area that you can explore and get lost in the history of the park. In some of the roads travel is difficult, but most of them are plowed out well. There are about 120 farms and homes in this district. Occasionally you will come across some old farming equipment in an empty field which is often an interesting subject to photograph.

IMG_3942b2

Typically the best time to visit this area is during the summer. The houses tend to be open to the public and there is a festival in August where you are able not only to see the barns and houses up close and personal, but you are able to get a deeper grasp of the historic value with several park rangers and volunteers working providing demonstrations of the typical life during the late 18th century and early 19th century.  However, I have found that from a photographic standpoint the contrast of some of these historic barns works well with the white snow cover. Being able to see this area during the winter season provides a little bit of a different perspective on the landscape. Here is a list of a few barns and places that I would stop by when visiting this area during the winter.

  1. Charles Olson Farm (pictured above)
  2. Dechow Farm
  3. Eckhert Farm
  4. Port Oneida School – The school is a historic school building, but is white and may blend in with white snow. It is worth a look though
  5. Thoreson Farm
  6. Brunson Barn

Save

Save

Winter Tales at Sleeping Bear

Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore draws in several thousands of visitors during the summer tourism season. Often the parking lots for viewing areas are filled and you cannot walk a quarter mile on one of the trails within the park without passing someone else. Sleeping Bear Dunes is a great place to visit during the spring, summer and fall seasons. Once those seasons pass the park numbers die down tremendously. It still sees quite a few visitors, but does not draw the crowd that it would during the main tourism season. A partial reason for this is that during the winter the Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive, one of the most popular attractions, is shut down for the season and only accessible by snowshoes or skis.

IMG_3926b

 

The winter season at Sleeping Bear Dunes offers plenty of fun and things to do. In this next series I will take a look at four key areas within the park that are must see stops if you visit the park during the winter. Each of these places provide plenty of photo opportunities as well as unique landscapes that offer a different perspective from the other seasons. The four areas that I am focusing on will be:

  1. Platte River area — The Platte River empties out into Lake Michigan at the end of the Platte River road. The journey to the mouth of the river gives you some unique views of the river itself.
  2. Empire Beach area — The South Bar Lake is nearby along with the Lake Michigan shoreline. You see sweeping views of the dunes from each direction. During the summer it is a beach goers paradise. In the winter; a frozen oasis with several unique formations of ice and sand.
  3. Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive — Closed for vehicle traffic, but accessible by snowshoes and skis. The various viewpoints are spectacular in the winter.
  4. Port Oneida Historic District — Old barns and homes from the historic district of long time settlers. It is a draw during the summer months, but somehow a blanket of white snow changes the perspective and contrast to what you would normally see.

 

Save

Save

The Little Known Ledges

The Grand River has not hardly had the impact as the Colorado River has with the Grand Canyon. However, there is evidence that the River has shaped the lands around it. The Ledges of Grand Ledge is one example. You can access the Ledges at Fitzgerald Park in the city of Grand Ledge. These ledges are sedimentary rock that was cut from the flow of the Grand River over years.  The sandstone formations were made by the process of slit and clay carried by the by the water and deposited in layers along the river, this creating the ledges that we see today. This park is a great hiking spot for nature lovers and I have found that it is also one of the lesser known natural areas within the state.

A6418b2

I have been there in each of the seasons. There is not a season where a trip to the ledges is not worth it. There is value in each season. In Spring and Summer you will see several ferns and plant life along the ledges. The leaves on the trees provide a nice shady walk in nature. During the fall season you are treated to the colorful changing of the leaves. My recent trip was during the winter. The snow on the ledges created a new and different scene from what I was used to. As you enter Fitzgerald Park you will be met with several picnic and playground areas. There are also a few baseball diamonds in the park as well. From the parking lot you will find a walkway taking you to the Historic Ledges Theater. Just around the back is a set of stairs heading to the ledges along the Grand River.

A6428b2

Right near the base of the stairway is a bridge over a creek that flows into the Grand River. You can go in two different directions. You can continue along the Grand River or explore the ledges along the creek. If you explore along the creek be aware that the trail is not paved and there are many natural dangers in your way. I found that you have to be very aware of where you are stepping. Rocks and tree roots pop up from the ground and it is easy to trip and fall. The trail also can lead you on the bank of the creek. In the winter this is especially crucial. If you lose your footing, it is easy to slide right down into the creek. The upswing to this area is that you will see some of the ledges hang right above you. This area is a great spot to nab a photograph of the kids or family.

A6442b2

Heading down the trail along the Grand River you are given views of the Grand River as well as the ledges over hanging above on the right side of the trail. This trail is not paved in areas as well but the trail is more distinct. This trail will take you toward Island Park. near the downtown area of Grand Ledge. This trail provides a great way to enjoy nature. As I hiked there in the winter, I saw frozen rolled up ferns hanging off some of the rocks. The views of these rocks are incredible. The trail also extends out on the other side of the stairway to the upper proportion of the park. If you are a hiker or nature enthusiast this is a good park to spend an afternoon at. For those rock climbing enthusiasts, Oak Park, located right across the river of Fitzgerald Park opens up the ledges for rock climbing. However, the bulk of the ledges can be found at Fitzgerald Park.

Save

Portland: The City of Bridges

The city of Portland, Michigan is known as the City of Two Rivers. The Grand River runs through the city while the Looking Glass River intersects it. Portland is located about 15 miles east of Lansing. Within the city there are a few parks that link together through a riverwalk system that extends to both sides of the river, and has four different steel bridges crossing over the Grand River at some point. One of those bridges can be seen from the freeway of Interstate 96 heading toward Grand Rapids. I have seen it many times while driving on the freeway and always wanted to get a closer look. I drove out to Portland on a rather snowy day and was glad I got to experience the charm of this small city of Michigan.

I came in from Grand River Avenue and parked my car near Fabiano’s River House Bar and Grill and walked over a small bridge heading to Two Rivers Park. This small bridge stood over the Looking Glass River near the intersection of the Grand River. The park had a rather nice Veterans Memorial section. From this park you could walk along the Grand River to a bridge that crossed the Grand River to Water Street. Along the way were a couple of people getting in a winter jog. The bridge is one of four historical bridges within the city. This bridge is an old railroad bridge converted to a pedestrian bridge with steel beams rising over the concrete. I had the unique experience of seeing this bridge during the winter. The Grand River was flowing under slabs of ice that had been pushed together. It looked like there was an ice blockage within the river.

A6340b2

I got into my car and then drove toward the freeway. I headed onto Market Street taking it to the freeway overpass. There I saw the historic steel bridge that I had seen so many times on the freeway. I walked across the bridge. The other side of the bridge led to private property along the Grand River. The best photo opportunity came from the side along Market Street. The view from the bridge opposite of the freeway was pretty spectacular. The ice frozen on the Grand River was cut in certain places. The pattern that the ice created was rather interesting. You could see a small island further down the Grand River. During the summer and fall seasons, this would be a great scenic viewpoint.

A6344b2

I continued along Canal Street heading back toward Downtown Portland. The last bridge I stopped at was the historical Bridge Street Bridge (also known as Veteran’s Memorial Bridge). This bridge is a one way bridge leading right into Downtown Portland. Cars driving over this truss bridge drive on the metal grate deck of the bridge crossing over the Grand River. Within 100 feet from the exit of the bridge is Kent Street in the middle of Downtown Portland. I took a couple photos from the banks of the river, but the Grand River had frozen over a little bit onto the sidewalks near the bank areas. I did not want to fall through any ice, so I stayed at a safe distance. I ended up driving over the bridge which was not as scary as I thought it might be for a bridge with a grate deck.

A6378b2

The city of Portland does have one more bridge further down near the high school. I did not get a chance to go out and see it. All the bridges are connected together through the Riverwalk and it would be a great way to see the city. My visit came during the winter and it was beautiful out there. However, I would recommend taking a walk along this trail system during the spring, summer or fall seasons. It was quite cold out when I went and the snow at times made it hard to see the views from the bridges. In spite of the winter weather, I was glad that I spent some time in Portland.

Save

Perilous Adventures: Presque Isle

Winter in Northern Michigan is a sight to behold. The best is traveling right after a snowstorm has cleared out and fresh snow is hanging on every branch of every tree. I had that opportunity a couple years ago when the day after a snowstorm, it was a beautiful day with blue skies and lots of sun. It was still quite cold out, but the driving conditions were pretty good. There were still a few dangerous issues out on the road though that I had not really thought about until it was too late. Earlier in the day I was at Iargo Springs near Oscoda. I made my way up to Alpena toward the middle of the afternoon only to face another setback. I was surprised to find out that lots of people get stuck in the same location I did.

img_2164b2

I traveled into Presque Isle just north of Alpena. The old and new lighthouses sit on each end of the isle. In my opinion the old one is the more interesting of the two. It is also a lot smaller, but the history and aesthetic appeal makes the old lighthouse a must see on any visit to the Alpena area. I stopped at the New Presque Isle Lighthouse first. It is at the northernmost end of the isle. The parking lot was cleared out and the lighthouse was opened for visitors. They were not doing tours up to the top of the lighthouse. I was there in the autumn season before and it can get quite windy. My guess is it is just too dangerous to make the climb up to the top due to the winter weather. You can still get an appreciation for the history of the lighthouse with the section that was opened. It is a nice lighthouse and definitely worth a stop to visit. Of the two lighthouses, the new lighthouse is also the most difficult to photograph in terms of lighting. The position of the lighthouse in relation to the sun makes it hard to get some different angles on the lighthouse.

 

My real adventure came when I visited the Old Presque Isle Lighthouse. As I mentioned before, this is what I feel is the more interesting lighthouse of the two. This lighthouse was closed up and a gate closed off the parking lot near the main road. I parked my car on the side area of the road where it looked like there was a bit of a turn off. That was my mistake. The whole area of the road is a soft shoulder. I ended up getting stuck for the second time that day. Countless efforts to dig myself out failed. Luckily, there was enough traffic that someone was able to pull me out with a chain. The guy that pulled me out lived down the street. He informed me that there is a marina parking lot about a quarter mile away that is plowed and a great place to park to view the lighthouse. I also found out that I was not the only one to park on the shoulders and get stuck. It turned out that this was quite common by many who were never aware of that marina parking lot.

Old Presque Isle Winter

I walked to the lighthouse. The snow was pretty deep in the area and no one had been there in the last 24 hours it looked like. At that time the water levels of Lake Huron were pretty low so there were quite a few rocks on the beach area outside of the lighthouse. The deep snow covered a lot of those rocks. It is very easy to misstep and trip over some of those rocks. A fresh blanket of snow with no previous trails made by anyone else in the last 24 hours left me to navigate my own way. I tripped up on some of those rocks and fell down hard. It is so easy to bang up your knee or twist your ankle in these conditions. It may not seem like a dangerous situation, but if you are not aware of what your surroundings are or the terrain that may be hidden, you could find yourself in a situation that could get you hurt.

Lighthouse

The two lighthouses are beautiful during the winter season. The most important lessons learned is to know your surroundings and avoid parking along roadways. Too many people find themselves on a soft shoulder that they cannot get out of. Northern Michigan gets a lot more snow than what we do in Southern Michigan. Often we have a mindset of doing things that we are used to from where we live. I never adjusted my frame of mind when I made the trip from Grand Rapids to Alpena. I made that same mistake when I went to Sleeping Bear Dunes a couple years before that. At one point I thought I was going need an emergency rescue on a hike. I will tell you exactly how I got out of that situation in a couple days.

Save