Winter Tales at Sleeping Bear Dunes: Port Oneida Historic District

The Port Oneida Historic District is one of the less traveled areas of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. This area continues north on M-22 into the Leelanau Peninsula. This is more of an area of countryside lands with old historic farms and houses. I have included this in one of the must see areas of a winter visit to Sleeping Bear Dunes for a reason. It is an area that you can explore and get lost in the history of the park. In some of the roads travel is difficult, but most of them are plowed out well. There are about 120 farms and homes in this district. Occasionally you will come across some old farming equipment in an empty field which is often an interesting subject to photograph.

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Typically the best time to visit this area is during the summer. The houses tend to be open to the public and there is a festival in August where you are able not only to see the barns and houses up close and personal, but you are able to get a deeper grasp of the historic value with several park rangers and volunteers working providing demonstrations of the typical life during the late 18th century and early 19th century.  However, I have found that from a photographic standpoint the contrast of some of these historic barns works well with the white snow cover. Being able to see this area during the winter season provides a little bit of a different perspective on the landscape. Here is a list of a few barns and places that I would stop by when visiting this area during the winter.

  1. Charles Olson Farm (pictured above)
  2. Dechow Farm
  3. Eckhert Farm
  4. Port Oneida School – The school is a historic school building, but is white and may blend in with white snow. It is worth a look though
  5. Thoreson Farm
  6. Brunson Barn

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A City Rebuilt After Tragedy

On June 22, 2015 the city of Portland, Michigan experienced something weather at its worst. An EF-1 category tornado ripped through the city destroying several businesses, churches and homes. It cut a path right across the downtown area and continued through the city. Areas that were not directly in the tornado’s path saw damage by the powerful winds. It came early in the afternoon stretching about 4 miles before pulling back up. At its strongest winds reached up to 100 mph. It was certainly not what the city was expecting, but something that became a reality during the early part of the summer that year.

I recently traveled into the city of Portland. It has been about a year and a half since that storm. A lot has changed since that early summer storm. It looks like the city has landed back on its feet. From what I saw, there did not seem to be any evidence of what used to be. I saw a city that was filled with a lot of activity. I crossed paths with a few of the people from Portland and they were excited to point out to me the areas of interest within the city. This was not a city that stayed down from devastation. This was a city that had rebuilt and kept pushing forward. This is a city where everyone is excited about their community and proud of where they live.

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The downtown shopping district seemed pretty busy on a Saturday morning when I stopped by. I parked my car and walked along the streets of the business district. There were signs of vacancy in some of the stores. At this point I could not say that this was in direct relation to what happened a couple years ago with the tornado. It seemed to be more of an ongoing issue with many small cities’ downtown districts. The economy in Michigan has improved over time, but several downtown businesses in the state’s smaller cities are struggling. On the other hand, I saw a couple shops and restaurants in Portland doing really well with several customers. This same area had several businesses damaged and there were really no strong signals of that damage as I walked through.

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I continued driving through Portland stopping at several parks that were effected. I saw new playground equipment in a few of these parks. I saw evidence of art in one park near the downtown area that was a recent addition. This park was in the path of the tornado. If you never had knowledge of this storm, the thought of a tornado ravaging through the park would have crossed the mind. This park was the most obvious evidence of a city rebuilt and moving on. As I traveled out of the city I saw new businesses and more modern architecture. It was evident that an event bringing tragedy was not enough to hold this city down.

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An Attraction Left Behind

During the spring season the city of Holland, Michigan comes alive with vibrant tulips of different shapes and colors. The city hosts its annual Tuliptime Festival each year during the first two weeks of May. During this festival there are massive crowds of people that travel from within the state. There are also many that come from out of state to see all that Holland has to offer. Many businesses within the city thrive during this festival. One of the main attractions to see during the festival is Windmill Island. This park has a variety of tulips on their grounds but also has an actual working Holland Windmill that was brought over from the Netherlands. This attraction brings in several visitors during the month of May. It is a place that is worth going to when in the city of Holland.

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Once the Tulip season passes it remains open as there are still many things to see within the park. The Windmill serves as the main attraction of the park. There are gift shops and a replica Netherlands village where you can find wooden shoes and demonstrations on how to make those shoes. During the winter is when the park closes up for the season. It remains open for people to walk in and view the windmill, but nothing is opened up. There are no tours and the shops are closed up. This is the time of year where you see the Holland Windmill in a different light.

I went there to see the windmill during the winter season. As I entered the large parking lot on a Saturday afternoon I found that I was the only one there. During Tulip time the parking lot would often be full and the park would be packed. It was evident that Windmill Island was like a ghost town during the winter season. I got out and walked through the freshly fallen snow. The only person I passed was a person from some nearby apartments on a winter jog. I made my way through the park and through the snowy grounds. It appears that even during the off season the grounds crew does not do much plowing with exception of the main lot. I crossed the Dutch Bridge and made my way to the Windmill to get a few photos. It was one of the most eerie feelings I have had. When you are so used to seeing a place alive with activity, it was strange to see a desolate scene. At the same time everything seemed so peaceful. Winter brought about a new way of seeing the park. It was beautiful.

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I would highly recommend going to Windmill Island during the Tuliptime Festival to get the experience of the celebration of the city’s heritage. You will gain an understanding of the Dutch culture and the history of these hard working people. You will see the Tulips in all their vibrancy. If you were to visit the attraction this would be the time to do so. However, if you are not far away and have the chance, I also recommend seeing this attraction during the winter season. You won’t be disappointed.

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On the Road to New Adventures

When getting ready to head out for a photo excursion I am usually excited thinking on what type of shot I want to come away with. I start thinking about the various angles I can shoot a particular subject, especially one that I have seen before. As a photographer you are always looking for new ways to challenge yourself. The four seasons hold various opportunities for the photographer. Each season brings about something new to be discovered or some unique challenge. I have found that winter photography brings about the biggest challenges due to the inclement weather that goes hand in hand with the season.

Aman Park, Grand Rapids
Aman Park, Grand Rapids

 

What is it about winter photography that creates some challenges that are hard to deal with. First of all, there are dangerous conditions. Ice out on the lakes, snowstorms and deep snow in some areas, and roadways that are difficult to drive all make winter photography a challenge to overcome. In some cases these challenges present dangerous and perilous situations. I have been in a few of those situation as have other photographers. I love the sense of adventure, but experiencing these situations have given me an additional appreciation for a safe return home. In the excitement of a new photography adventure, I pray for a safe return home to my loved ones.

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Along the way I have experienced some dangerous situations in winter photography excursions. Next week I will be writing a four part series on the dangers of winter photography in Michigan. These are situations that I have dealt with over the last several years in the field. I have seen plenty of beautiful winter scenes, but had I known what lied in front of me prior to heading out, I may have approached it differently. Michigan is a wonderful place during winter, but sometimes we don’t have all the information when we start. With a little bit of information from someone who has experienced some of the dangers and pitfalls, some dangers can be avoided. I want your journey to be as safe as possible.

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Seasons Collide

I love the fall color season in Michigan. I only wish that it lasted a little longer. There is nothing like taking a walk in the woods smelling fall in the air and hearing the rustling of leaves below your feet. The colors in Michigan are amazing. The colors can vary from year to year based on weather conditions prior to the fall season, however the fall color season in Michigan usually does not disappoint. This year we experienced a late color season as we had unusual warm temperatures throughout October. In those years it is not uncommon to transition into winter really quickly. This year we have seen some snowfall throughout the state when there were still a few leaves hanging on the trees yet. This transition of seasons can make for some interesting photo opportunities.

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Before Halloween my wife and I got to farm markets and buy small pumpkins and gourds. They are the perfect fall decoration around the house. If left uncut these pumpkins and gourds can last for a couple months. That is perfect for me because I love to have the house decorated in fall decor right up to Thanksgiving. There are many ways to preserve your small pumpkins to transform them into Christmas decorations found on places like Pinterest, but I try to get rid of mine after Thanksgiving. This time of year is that key transitional season. We have had snow before Thanksgiving in years past. If you still have small pumpkins and gourds around while the snow falls, they can be used as interesting seasonal photos.

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A couple years ago we had an early winter. The snow started falling in mid November. Many places throughout the state had record snowfall in November. In many places within the state saw no accumulating snowfall. It was a green Christmas that year, but I was thankful the snow came when it did. We had just transitioned out of the fall color season. There were still a few leaves clinging to the trees, but most of them had fallen on the ground. I still had my small pumpkins in the house for Thanksgiving decor. I gathered all of them up and took them to a local park. I was able to place various pumpkins in the snow showcasing two seasons in one. It is not often that the seasons will collide like they did that year. It is also a blessing when snowfall hits and there are still colors on the leaves. Those are rare opportunities to take advantage of. I have also had a blast taking photos during these times. The same can be said of spring and winter as flowers start blooming and a late spring snowfall occurs.

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Discovering the Undiscovered

Sitting around a table with some acquaintances of mine we were generating conversation about places we wanted to go see in our home state of Michigan. The usual places that most people want to visit such as Mackinac Island and the bridge, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, and summer resort cities like Grand Haven, Petoskey and Ludington were high on everyone’s list. In spite of knowing about these places, it amazed me how little people really knew about some of Michigan’s most frequently visited locations. It astounded me that several people did not know that cities like Marshall, Coldwater, Monroe, Bad Axe, Clare, Midland, Ironwood, Hancock and Copper Harbor even existed in the State of Michigan.

Mackinac Bridge, Mackinaw City
Mackinac Bridge, Mackinaw City

 

To be honest, while I have heard of these cities; there are a few things that I never knew existed within these cities. Earlier this summer I stopped at the Underground Railroad Monument in Battle Creek. Did you know that the monument is operated by the U.S. National Park Service? I would have never thought it was, but it makes sense in hindsight. They have a park ranger right at the monument to answer any all all questions about the fascinating history of the Underground Railroad and how it impacted Michigan. There are so many events and places that I have yet to discover in our great state. Don’t get me wrong, I love the lighthouse tours and the pristine waterfalls in the Upper Peninsula, but there is more to learn and more to discover.

The Underground Railroad Monument, Battle Creek
The Underground Railroad Monument, Battle Creek

This past year in photography has been a little bit of a transition for me. I have wanted to discover the unknown. I have wanted to get the experience of what is now known as our state’s famous tagline “Pure Michigan”. I have been blessed to see the Mackinac Bridge and many of the state’s famous landmarks. I yearn to see more and gain an understanding of what this state has to offer. To experience Michigan is to also converse with the people behind the scenes of some our cities annual events, or those running the museums, cider mills, and farm markets.

Skyline towers, Grand Rapids
Skyline towers, Grand Rapids

I have learned a great deal throughout this past year and I plan to pass some of this information along. Some of my posts will contain some facts and statistics about certain places as it is important to have some of the detailed information. However, a majority of the posts are going to be experienced based. I will not write as if I am an expert on various places within Michigan. Instead I will provide content about the journey to discovering new and exciting places. Those who are looking to find out what Michigan has to offer come with me on this journey. Let’s discover the mitten state together!

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