Winter’s Big Red

Visitors that pour into Holland State Park are rewarded with views of the Holland Harbor Lighthouse. The lighthouse to many has been refereed to as “Big Red”, and it has become a staple of the city of Holland, Michigan. At the state park you can view it from across the channel. The lighthouse rests on the south part of the channel while the State Park lies on the northern part of the channel. The best way to view the lighthouse is to get up close and personal on the south side of the channel, but there are challenges to getting access to the south end of the channel.

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Like several other places within the state, some of the state’s attractions have been limited due to private property and gated communities. This is the issue that one will face when trying to access the south side of the Holland Channel. The area is gated off and you can not gain access inside unless you are renting a cottage or live within this community. I have found that parking near the marina is the best option. During the winter this area is free of cars and you will run into little problems. In the summer due to the fact that it is a marina, parking may be limited or you may be told to not park there. From the marina I have been able to walk into the gated community. It is not blocked off by steel gates (for the time being, as the Van Andel family has had much influence in keeping people out). It is about a mile walk from the marina to the lighthouse itself. Once you get past a large area of open spaces along Lake Macatawa you begin to enter the cottages area spanning along the channel. You will have to go through the cottage area to get to the walkway to the channel and to Big Red.

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The lighthouse is impressive up close. You get a real scale sense of the size of the lighthouse compared to seeing it from the state park. The best vantage points of the lighthouse though come a little farther away. One of my favorite viewing spots of this lighthouse especially during the winter is along the bay in the small dunes area. The snow drifts up on the dunes and creates unique patterns with the sand and snow. It serves as a great foreground element in the photograph. I have also found that the pier extending beyond the lighthouse offers a great vantage point of the lighthouse. The lining of the blue railings lead the eye straight to the lighthouse in the distance. These are two views of the lighthouse that you won’t get across the channel at the state park. On the south side you are offered more of a 3D view of the lighthouse, whereas the state park views often are more one or two dimensional.

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If you are willing to do a little walking to get to the the lighthouse, the view on the other side is worth it. In a perfect world, there would be no privatization of land to get to some of the states most beloved attractions. However, this seems to be the norm more and more every year. As of now, a person can still walk into the gated community to have access of the lighthouse. It is not clear if and when that would change. If you are lucky sometimes when they are doing construction on the houses being built the gate remains open and you can drive right in. However, that is not always going to be the case. Take advantage of the access while you can, and enjoy the great views of the lighthouse.

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St. Joseph on Ice

Two years ago Michigan saw a pretty cold winter. The Great Lakes were freezing over quite well and shelf ice expanded out into the lake nearly to the end of many piers. The year before that, the Great Lakes had almost totally frozen over. The seasonal snowfall reached far above average for both of those years. 2014-2015 was the last winter season where we saw this in Michigan. It has been fairly quiet in the last couple winters, especially for Southern Michigan. There is still that chance we will see these massive freezing events in future winter seasons, but we will have to wait for it.

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In the early part of 2015 I ventured down to St. Joseph to experience the pier and lighthouse frozen over. I spent most of my time at Tiscornia Park on the north side of the channel. From the parking lot I ventured up in the dunes where you could see a sweeping view of the pier and the lighthouses (inner light and outer light). People were climbing up on the catwalk as some of the ice had made it accessible up there. I really liked the distance view. The brown dune grass extending out from the snow drifts in the dunes, the sand and snow mixing together made it a perfect foreground for the pier and lighthouse.

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I made my way out into the shoreline area. The shelf ice was present right at the start of the shoreline. The only issue that presented an immediate danger is that the shelf ice was small and the drop offs were only a few inches as opposed to several feet near the open water further out. The snow covered this up, so it was quite easy to misstep and turn the ankles. I used my tripod as a walking stick and that helped a lot. Being out on the shelf ice was a unique experience because there were several balls of sand and ice all throughout the landscape. It was as if you were on a different planet. I started making my way over to the inner lighthouse. This is where several people started using the catwalk to get past the inner light and out on parts of the pier navigating past narrow passages that could lead one slipping right into the water. I chose not to hit the catwalk. I went out onto the shelf ice again and got some photos of the lighthouse at a safe area. Had I gone further, I would have ventured out into unsafe areas of ice where the water below was shifting that ice around.

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My adventure at St. Joseph was a very good one. I stayed in areas that were safe and was able to capture some good photographs of the lighthouse and pier. Having the opportunity out on the ice gave me a new appreciation for winter at our states Lake Michigan Lighthouses. The change in landscape is so dramatic that it is like experiencing another world during the winter than what is the norm during spring, summer and fall. We most likely won’t see that type of ice for the remainder of this year, but there is always the possibility of next year. The weather patterns tend to go in cycles where it is warm a couple years and then cold for a couple years. If that pattern holds, we may be seeing ice out on the lake in the next few years to come.

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