Land of the Frozen Ghosts

The Silver Lake sand dunes stretch out for miles between Silver Lake and Lake Michigan. The state park draws in plenty of visitors in the summer to ride off road vehicles on the dunes, hike hills of the dunes, take a tour ride of the dunes, visit the campground on Silver Lake or just enjoy a day at the beach near Little Sable Point Lighthouse. There is no shortage of activity during the summer months at Silver Lake State Park. During the winter, the area shuts down. The dune tours close up, restaurants and gift shops shut down, and the whole area is like a ghost town. This time of the year is a prime time to see the ghosts of a different kind at the state park.

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The dunes are home to a section of ghost forests. These ghost forests are great to visit during the summer, but also provide an interesting view of the dune landscape during the winter. The best way to access the ghost forest is a small parking lot off North Shore Drive. This small park area is the access to the pedestrian dunes. There are a series of boardwalk stairs taking you up to the dunes where you will have to climb up the dunes for about 25 feet. The challenge to this during a snowy winter is that the snow drifts build up on that side of the dunes once the boardwalk stairs end, making access nearly impossible. If you do run into that issue, don’t fret because there is another way to the dunes. Simply walk down to the end of the parking lot near the ORV section of the dunes. There is a small entryway to the dunes as it crosses over to the ORV part of the dunes. In the winter time, you are not going to have to worry about being in the way of any ORV’s.

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As you access the dunes, head back toward the way you would have started from the boardwalk. Make your way out into the dunes for about a quarter mile and you start to run into the wooden stumps of the ghost forest. The various shaped wooden stumps are all over the dunes and scattered in about a half mile radius. Walking on the dunes is a little easier in the winter than it can be in the summer. The winter temperatures freeze the surface of the sand and it is like walking on concrete. Pay attention to the various patters of snow and sand mixed together as they can create some interesting photo opportunities. While you are out there, it is easy to lose yourself in the environment. There are no sounds of ORV’s in the distance. There are usually no visible signs of other people. You are in the midst of the sights and sounds of the winter winds.

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The ghost forest area is a place that several people don’t really think about when visiting the park in the winter. The lighthouse will always be the more popular attraction. I think that it is only fitting that one should visit the ghost forest during the winter since the whole park seems to be like a giant ghost town. It is a far contrast between winter and summer, but that is what makes it worth coming to in the two seasons. You do get quite a bit of a workout on the dunes and winter hiking can be a challenge, but you will walk away with some pretty unique photographs if you are up to the challenge.

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The Ludington Mile

Ludington State Park has several dunes, a couple miles of shoreline along Lake Michigan, campgrounds, and several hiking trails to provide something for everyone. The park sees several visitors every year and many of them come during the summer months. During the winter there are still a few visitors to the park, but the areas many recreational opportunities are slightly more limited. A big draw for visitors during the winter months remains the Big Sable Lighthouse. It is about a mile hike out to the lighthouse from the parking lot, but several people are up for the breathtaking winter hike.

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The first part of the hike out to Big Sable Point Lighthouse is not that bad. The concrete trail is plowed out and is usually pretty accessible. The trail stays plowed for about a quarter mile out. After this point the trail is no longer plowed out and the snow drifts can be deep in certain places. I found that the deepest snow is right at the begining where the trail is no longer plowed and toward the middle point of the trail when the dunes open up a bit. The snow and sand are blown and infused together at times so it is very possible to be hiking on a couple inches of snow and then fall knee deep in snow a few feet ahead. Be prepared to get a workout when the snow and sand mix together. The snow keeps the sand relatively soft so it is harder to navigate through it all. If you were to step up onto some of the sand dunes, the sand gets a little harder due to the cold temperatures and freezing at the surface level of the dunes. I have seen a few people navigate onto the dunes to avoid the deep drifts of sand/snow on the main trail. I don’t believe there is a real easy way to navigate to the lighthouse in winter conditions.

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Once you get to the lighthouse, you are treated to a frozen tundra around the lighthouse at Lake Michigan. On some years the lake is really frozen over and self ice extends out into the lake. Other years there is ice, but not as much on the lake itself. I have found that an interesting vantage point of the lighthouse can be seen from atop the dunes just beyond the lighthouse to the north. Once you have made it to the lighthouse, I would recommend spending a little time there and taking it all in. The lighthouse itself is closed for the season, but the views of the lighthouse are excellent. As you make your way back, I would advise taking the same way you came on the main trail. You can opt to hike back along the lakeshore. This is more advisable during summer. During the winter it is too easy to hurt yourself on the ice.

 

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Muskegon State Park Snow Adventures

Visiting Michigan’s State Parks during the winter can be a great recreational experience. During the winter there is a chance to see the parks in a different way than what many are accustomed to during the summer. There are also a few additional things to experience during the winter season than you would have during the summer. Often are winters in Michigan provide a lot of snow. Lately we have not had average snowfall in many parts of Michigan. I went to Muskegon a few years ago when we were getting a decent amount of snowfall and found the experience to be an adventure I would not forget.

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I drove into the State Park and was greeted by the sight of a ice covered Lake Michigan. Self Ice extended out into the lake pretty far. In the very distance you could see the open water. The park road takes you toward the main beach area. However, due to heavy snow, the plowed area of the road stops short of the beach area. This means that you have to walk it in from a small parking area. The thought of walking through large drifts of snow did not thrill me, the snow was no reason to stop me. In what was an interesting turn of events, further down the road there has hardly any snow at all as it was protected between large sand dunes. I started my way along the beach area and the parking lot. I had to climb up some dunes to head out toward the break walls. The dunes were interesting as a mixture of sand and snow made several unique patterns crafted by the winds off the lake. The break wall is made up of several large boulders. On a summer day, you can walk out along the break wall and see the boats coming in and out of the channel area connecting Lake Michigan with Muskegon Lake. The top of the break wall was pretty icy and it appeared to be too dangerous to walk out. I could see the lighthouse structure on the other end of the channel at the Pier Marquette Beach area from where I was standing.

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A small bay rests between the break wall and the channel. It is not that difficult to reach the channel from there. There is a walkway along the channel extending from Lake Michigan to the shore of Muskegon Lake. This also parallels the campground area. During the summer it is a prefect place to do a little fishing or catch the boats passing through. In the winter time, it is a nice little walk and hike. When I was there, the channel was open water and not frozen over in any place. The walkway along the channel also had minimal snow cover as well; making the hike much easier. The winter atmosphere was different than what I have experienced before. I had been so used to several people out on the walkway during the summer, it was strange to have the whole area to myself. It was quiet and peaceful. On the way back I took the roadside heading back to my car. The dunes area along the break wall near the beach was a bit strenuous. I walked through areas of road with little snow to areas covered in a couple feet of snow. Much of it depended on open areas surrounding the road.

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Although this park is much easier to navigate during the summer and has several recreational opportunities I would not recommend that anyone stay away from this park during the winter. Chances are you will not only have parts of the park alone to yourself, but the change in landscape scenery gives you a greater appreciation of the park. When I found the road closed up and had the chance to just turn around, I am glad I made the choice to go on foot from that point. I would have missed out on a lot if I had turned back.

 

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Perilous Adventures: Lake Michigan Ice

The winter season is always a fun one in Michigan. There are many great places to see and things to do. I have been fortunate enough to live close enough to Lake Michigan to visit many of the lighthouses frozen over during the winter. The freeze begins in December and on those particularly cold winters the ice ramps up along the piers of the lighthouses. There have been a couple years where the Great Lakes froze quite a bit along the shorelines creating a lot of shelf ice. When this happens it is like a totally different world that what you are used to during the spring, summer and fall seasons. It is a frozen oasis with many hills and cliffs to explore. There is a particular danger to this ice though. The water of the lake and its currents are in constant motion under the ice. In some cases the ice can break away and weaken. Shelf ice out on Lake Michigan has become increasingly dangerous and not many people are aware of the potential danger that lies out on the ice.

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In 2014 Lake Michigan had froze quite a bit. The shelf ice extended all the way past the lighthouse and pier. It brought many people out to the state park that year. Kids would sled down some of the ice hills near the base of the lakeshore. The ice was pretty solid there and they were pretty safe that close to the shoreline. Many photographers like myself were attracted to the lighthouses as that year was the most frozen I had seen the lake in a long time. Ottawa County Sheriff and and Coast Guard personnel were out there on a regular basis. They had knowledge that the currents below were moving some of the ice. They were advising everyone to stay off the ice beyond the end of the pier at outer lighthouse. They did not have to warn me twice, but I did see others ignore the warning. One person that ignored that warning not only put the himself in danger, but also put me in a dangerous spot as well.

In Case of Emergency

I was taking some photos of the outer lighthouse encased in ice along the edge of the pier. I was just on the very edge of what was described as the “safe zone”. While I was taking shots, another photographer from Wisconsin decided to ignore the warnings and go further out. His buddy stayed back. I watched him navigate out on the ice about 20 feet beyond the pier and lighthouse into Lake Michigan. He yelled to his buddy that the ice was pretty solid. I also heard him state that the police officer had no clue what he was talking about. I continued to take some photographs. Suddenly I heard a yell from out where that gentleman was. He had slipped down into some loose ice. His foot was down in about six inches of water. He stated that there was some ice still under his foot, but he heard cracking sounds. I set my camera down. His buddy and myself started making our way toward him. He was able to grab onto some solid ice and pull himself away. We stood where we were as he slowly made his way back to us. Both of us were ready to go out and try to get him if he ran into more trouble. He finally made his way back to us without any issues. We all slowly made our way back to the pier and onto solid ice.

Iced Over

The ice out on the Great Lakes can be fun to explore, but can be extremely dangerous. I have heard many close calls from photographers taking the appearance of solid ice for granted. When going out on the ice, stay safe out there. If the police and Coast Guard are giving warnings of the dangers out there, heed their advice. Winter photography is challenging and very rewarding. There are many things that you can do ahead of time to make sure you stay safe out there. In some cases it is a matter of listening to those who know the terrain and the area well.  There is no shame in seeking the advice of others. In other cases, it comes down to knowing information ahead of time so you can be prepared and make the most of your winter photography experience. There are things that I wished I knew ahead of my trips. Had I known what I was up against, I could have saved myself a lot of time and heartache dealing with dangerous winter situations. Winter in Michigan is beautiful. Stay safe and take a lot of great photos.

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